LIFE IN TRANSITION

Submitted by admin on Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:34

Sangeeta Chacko, Head, Corporate Communications, Percept Limited says that the age old expression of feeling comfortable in your own skin does not hold true anymore in today’s day and age where taking on a new identity is paramount to survival and success

 

BY SANGEETA CHACKO

Head, Corporate Communications, Percept Limited

We’ve often heard the expression “Feeling comfortable in your own skin” and yet never really grasped how contrary this is to our age of existence today. Never has this statement been more difficult to embrace than the current era where life is continually in a dynamic state of transition, change and evolution. Learning new skills, adaptability to new situations, and taking on a new identity is paramount to survival and success... and yet an extremely uncomfortable thing for most of us to do.
 

Self identity is a fluid state, ever changing and completely adaptable to its environment. It is ideal not to get fixated on a favourite self persona, in case you need to shed it before long. Spring blossoms don’t shed tears over the flowers that wilted in the cold of winter, butterflies don’t cry over the destruction of the caterpillar, and neither does a snake mourn when it has to shed its skin. During the shedding process, the snake is clearly uncomfortable, sluggish and inactive, applying its entire energy to this single-minded task of ridding the old to make room for the new. But the shedding process enables it to grow into a larger, competent, skilful, more evolved creature, better able to adapt to its environment and satisfy its imminent needs.
 

While butterflies and snakes do this physically, we humans allegorically shed our own skin when it is time to grow professionally, personally or spiritually. Sometimes this process is voluntary such as ending an unfulfilling relationship, shifting careers or geographies. But many times this ‘shedding’ process is thrust upon us, such as unforeseen financial loss, health issues or the bereavement of a loved one.
 

While such situations are exceptionally painful, they intensely change you and hurtle you into a new version of yourself. Like a snake, when detaching your old identity, you will feel completely out of sorts, be angry, gloomy and confused. But only once you slip into your new skin and emerge fully into your new identity, will you have the lucidity of mind to appreciate the test and comprehend the remarkable growth that has occurred.

Renewal and rebirth is an ongoing 24x7 process that requires opening yourself up to new ways of thinking, feeling, speaking and behaving. While the metamorphosis phase is uncomfortable, it can be better embraced by looking at the bigger picture of who you are becoming. Be kind to yourself, cry, scream, and take time off to be alone if required. But learn to be observant enough to examine who you want to be, what you are growing into, and where you want to go next.
 

Slipping into your new identity takes time. The old you has fallen by the wayside, even as the new you is a bigger, better, grander version, filled with immense awareness, maturity and potential. The stronger, more enlightened you now tackles challenges seamlessly that previously seemed insurmountable. And are you done growing? Not even close. This circle will repeat again, under different circumstances, facing new trials and hurdles... all necessary for your own greater good.
 

Life is a wondrous symphony of continuous transition and evolution. Holding on to the past is impossible and futile. Every single cell in your body replaces itself over a span of seven years. That means there’s not even a smallest part of you now that was part of you seven years ago. A person in his 40s is no longer the same teenager he once was. Trying to improve ourselves and change old behaviours is no easy feat. It can be trying, and at times, it can get downright dreadful. But if you are able to make it through, you will be left with a much better version of yourself.
 

@ FEEDBACK
sangeeta.chacko@perceptindia.in

Category: 
Volume No: 
14
Issue No: 
13